The LIST (The Libary of Important Stories and Tales.)

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The LIST (The Libary of Important Stories and Tales.)

Postby muffinman42 » Tue Apr 17, 2012 3:48 pm

I would like to discuss about books that make you feel and think. Books that you would suggest to others not because they would enjoy them (though there's a good chance they would) but because it contains a vital lesson about how we live and who we are. I want to see a range of books, From Young adult fiction to String theory text books! Stories and yarns that weave their way into your heart or taught you about love in all it's meaning and immaculate beauty. If somebody Has posted a book already then you could contribute any different thoughts you had, just don't duplicate too many entries as having 10 "The Gospel according to Luke is a pretty swell story" is not as productive as 10 very distinct "The Gospel according to Luke is...".

I shall start with several books that spend much of their time beside my bed or sitting proud a top my shelves.
Please refrain from retelling the story, Talk about it's teachings and it's lessons not how it taught them. After all; this is a book you treasure and want to have others enjoy, And the best way to enjoy a book is to sit down on a sunny moaning with a cool drink and rise from your chair in time to prepare your evening meal during which you will mull over the tale and decode it's tragedies and it's glimmers of golden epiphanies.
First a template to help keep this thread organized.
Code: Select all
[b]TITLE[/b] [i]AUTHOR (put in brackets if it is a pen name or of questionable origins[/i]
[ABOUT THE BOOKS MEANING, (leave the brackets if your taking a break from writing the entry)]
[EXTRA DETAILS]


Now starting from the middle:

The Fault In Our Stars John Green

'As the tides washed in, the Dutch Tulip Man faced the ocean: "Conjoiner rejoiner poisoner concealer reveltor. Look at it, rising up and rising down, taking everything with it."
"What's that?" I asked
"Water," the Dutchman said. "Well, and time."
-PETER VAN HOUTEN, An imperial Affliction'

You might think it odd for me to talk about how i feel this book is important by referring to it's epigraph which is of course a quote form a different book. I would suggest Imperial Affliction as i have heard it to be a wonderful and deep book and I know of at least two people who loved it dearly; So if you ever find a copy please tell me, I promise high rewards.
The Authors note is also important, It teaches us an important message that I carry with me as a reminder; "Neither novels nor their readers benefit from attempts to divine whether any facts hide inside a story. Such efforts attack the very idea that made-up stories can matter, which is sort of the foundational assumption of our species." It tells you an important thing, a message that every religion has missed, that things don't have to be true to matter. A book can affect and shape your life further than any truth could.
This is not the only message hiding amongst the tale of Hazel and Augustus, The knowledge of coming death and impending doom sits strongly on both their shoulders. Not because they are poets or philosophers but because of terminal illness and the knowledge that the fight can not last forever. The idea of life is not permanent, that one day everyone will be dead and nobody will be alive to remember Aristotle or Cleopatra let alone you. But this is not a morbid book, although it is a tragedy, it displays human oblivion and all that surrounds it; To think of today and not tomorrow, as the future is just a series of present.

It is widely available, being a recent release and best seller, so any good contemporary bookshop should stock a copy. I will talk about several other John Green books, as like I said I am going though a pile not a list; and will add books as i please and extend entries when I figure out something new or a way to phrase my feelings.

The Alchesmist Paulo Coelho

[This is my favorite book and I have read it many times, but find it difficult to explain it's meaning and purpose.
Ostensibly it is the tale of a Shepard, Santiago, and his search for his treasure; But that is not interesting at all. The book talks about the heart and the soul and of Love. (the book is translated and I fear the english language may be missing a word for what it means, but "Love" is a decent substitute for what it is trying to mold into words)
Love is about Complexity and beauty, the reverse of entropy. It takes simple things and builds them up into marvelous things.]

This Is also a contemporary book and available from many bookshops, and i highly recommend reading it as that is the only way to find out it's teachings.

The Shadow of the Wind Carlos Ruiz Zafon
[TBA: give me a couple of days to finish re-reading it]
Contemporary, took a bit of searching.


Looking For Alaska John Green
[It made me cry. It still makes me cry. I am going to stop writing this and stare at the ceiling for a bit... John green is really good at building characters you care about, and i don't think i can talk about it without spoilers so please read the book.]
This Is also a contemporary book and available from many bookshops.

Paper Towns John Green
[Amazing, it's about what we expect people to be and who they are, and the difference between loving the visible and invisible parts of a person. It is about dedication and hope. It is also about how our lives are clotted by the future; Going to school to get into University, to get a job, to pay your pension, to die. That maybe we need to look at what our time on earth is, a series of nows, being impulsive and doing what you want to be doing rather than preparing your tomb.
It is also about the complete converse of that, Planning and Preparing, The dreams of a 10 year old cross hatched with the ambition of a 16 year old. The idea of what you wanted people to be, what you thought they where, and who they are; Which can be surprising in many ways.]

If you have read TFiOS or Looking for Alaska then the plot will seem predictable, but there is a greater significance to the tragedy and the idea of "I love you, Present tense".

It's hiding somewhere and has a very cool cover What's his name
[Really cool]
[EXTRA DETAILS]

The Good People Steve Cockayne
[This is really fucked up, but so brilliant]
This Is also a contemporary book.

Excuse the half a million edits.

P.S. Is it possible to get some type of spoiler tag so that people can hide entire entries (other than the title and author of course) as it's kinda impossible to talk about some books without giving the game away.
Last edited by muffinman42 on Tue Apr 17, 2012 4:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The LIST (The Libary of Important Stories and Tales.)

Postby muffinman42 » Tue Apr 17, 2012 4:13 pm

Ok. I hope to fill this out over a period of time, Partly as a writing and literature exercise and partly to sort though the muddle of emotions and thoughts which swirl their colourful and confusing dance in my mind.
Reserving second post for more books. :D
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Re: The LIST (The Libary of Important Stories and Tales.)

Postby Zupponn » Tue Apr 17, 2012 9:03 pm

muffinman42 wrote:The Good People Steve Cockayne

Haha. Cock.
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Re: The LIST (The Libary of Important Stories and Tales.)

Postby Natalya » Wed Apr 18, 2012 10:18 am

I'm not really a book person. I read internet news though lol. Uhh I can't think of any in particular that changed my life recently.
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Re: The LIST (The Libary of Important Stories and Tales.)

Postby Keldoclock » Thu Apr 19, 2012 1:56 pm

Zelanzy's Chronicles Of Amber, I can submit you guys my own warez version with everything about Amber in it that Zelanzy had, right up until he died.

EDIT: Including the short stories, of course!
Last edited by Keldoclock on Fri Apr 20, 2012 10:39 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The LIST (The Libary of Important Stories and Tales.)

Postby Arkbrik » Thu Apr 19, 2012 2:41 pm

I loved the Chronicles of Amber. Stuff really happens all the time in those books.
Remus: Harry... I'm a werewolf.
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Remus: Well yes, but I don't see how that applies here.
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Re: The LIST (The Libary of Important Stories and Tales.)

Postby IVhorseman » Thu Apr 19, 2012 2:53 pm

Heart of Darkness was my favorite book in High School, and I'm happy to find that it remained so after re-reading it for class this semester.
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Re: The LIST (The Libary of Important Stories and Tales.)

Postby Apollyon » Fri Apr 20, 2012 4:30 am

IVhorseman wrote:Heart of Darkness was my favorite book in High School, and I'm happy to find that it remained so after re-reading it for class this semester.


I have read it the for the second or third time only a few weeks ago and although i am somewhat fascinated i still don't get it...
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Re: The LIST (The Libary of Important Stories and Tales.)

Postby IVhorseman » Sat Apr 21, 2012 2:14 pm

The sentences are long and windy like the Congo River they travel on like Bonn-o-Tron. It's murky, and hard to tell what actually lies ahead or is under the surface. Can Marlowe's story (which is told to you through yet another motherfucker for the narrator) really be trusted as the entire, unobjectionable truth of what happened in the jungle? As is shown in the final scene when he tells Kurtz's intended that thing he tells her (no spoilers, sorry), it's pretty clear that a lot of the book is about the things that are not said, rather than the things that are.
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Re: The LIST (The Libary of Important Stories and Tales.)

Postby Bonn-o-Tron » Sat Apr 21, 2012 8:22 pm

2666 Roberto Bolano
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In 2003 the Chilean author Roberto Bolano died of liver failure, leaving behind his unfinished magnum opus, 2666, of which all but the fifth and final part had been written.
At a healthy 878 pages, this book is probably the most satisfying story I've ever read, and goes beyond what I thought was possible for fiction prose.

2666 is a novel that isn't about the plot, but rather the characters, the situations they find themselves in, how they cope, and the detriment it has on their psyche. In fact, for the first four parts of the novel, about 600~ pages (I don't have my copy on me, so I'm guessing at page amounts), there is no clear protagonist. Instead, there are series of loosely related events surrounding the Mexican city of Santa Teresa near the USA/Mexico border. Santa Teresa is actually a fictional mirror of the city of Ciudad Juárez, where in both reality and the novel (although, of course, it is Santa Teresa in 2666) there have been over 300 unsolved murders of women.

This backdrop for Bolano's chilling tale is introduced in Part 1 - The Part About the Critics, in which four European scholars all independently discover an unknown, enigmatic German author named Benno von Archimboldi, of whose life no true details are known. The four critics are brought together by their respective obsessions with the author, becoming close friends (and eventually lovers). While their relationships deteriorate under the weight of a sticky love triangle, they are drawn towards Santa Teresa, where Archimboldi is rumoured to have been seen. The Europeans' relationships eventually decompose almost completely, and their search is entirely fruitless. Archimboldi is never found, and Part 1 ends. These characters are never seen again in the book (except for Archimboldi, but I won't say anything else about him).

This trend of unresolved conflicts pervades the next three parts, which I won't get into, as 2666 is best enjoyed without any knowledge of its contents (okay, I spoiled Part 1, but it won't ruin the story for you). Admittedly, I'm not sure whether this feeling of a lack of completion was deliberate, but it fits extremely well and, as I said before, 2666 is not about its plot, but rather its characters. Despite this, 2666 still has a beautiful plot. After having read four and a half parts, I still was quite uncertain where the hell the story was going (I was beginning to suspect it wasn't going anywhere), but by an incredible feat of story-telling prowess, Bolano manages to draw together all 5 parts in the final 100 pages. In fact the entire story is told out of chronological order (think Pulp Fiction) and due to its cyclical nature, there is no obvious beginning or end (originally the 5 parts were intended to be published and read individually).

Unconventional plot structure aside, 2666 also has going for it Bolano's idiosyncratic style. He is quite clearly influenced by his Latin American predecessors (namely: Borges and Marquez) and employs a wavering, meandering style that is half magical realism and half post-modernism. Adding to the confusing flow of the story, Bolano often digresses on vaguely-related tangents that, despite seemingly adding nothing to the actual conflicts and events of the plot, contribute to the overall theme and feeling of their respective parts. The characterization and world-building are top-notch, and 2666's writing has a ghastly feel to it. Murder, death and snuggle abound (in one of the parts, the aforementioned hundreds of murders are described and chronicled for four years) and yet, there is almost a certain beauty to the way they are described. Bolano treats these topics as exactly what they are: simply another aspect of the horrifying modern world we live in.

TL;DR/in summation
Read this book. Seriously. If you have the perseverance to digest it, it's truly unlike anything else you've read. I believe it's one of the greatest novels of this generation.
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Re: The LIST (The Libary of Important Stories and Tales.)

Postby Zupponn » Sun Apr 22, 2012 12:52 am

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You don't need to read another book ever again.
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Re: The LIST (The Libary of Important Stories and Tales.)

Postby stubby » Sun Apr 22, 2012 7:21 pm

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2666 reminded me of this. The Illuminatus Trilogy transformed my view of politics and world history and is a major influence on BrikWars and everything in it.
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Re: The LIST (The Libary of Important Stories and Tales.)

Postby Alex » Sun Apr 22, 2012 7:37 pm

One book that's really fun to read is BADASS by Ben Thompson. It's a book about real historical figures such as Leonidas, Alexander the Great, Vlad the Impaler, General Patton and Bruce Lee and the epic deeds that they accomplished. The book is full of violence and profanity and is basically :belushi: in real life. He also has a website called badassoftheweek.com where he has stories about tons of other badasses and their exploits.
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